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Electrical Process Bias Measurement Using Conductive Photoresist

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119434D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bergendahl, AS: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

By using an electrically conductive photoresist and making electrical measurements on test patterns after photo development, process bias may be determined prior to etching. Unlike previous use of similar test patterns to measure bias in etched conductive films, measurement of conductive photoresist patterns permits rework of unsatisfactory photo processing. An insulating film, e.g., an anti-reflection coating, is applied over conductive films before applying the conductive photoresist.

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Electrical Process Bias Measurement Using Conductive Photoresist

      By using an electrically conductive photoresist and making
electrical measurements on test patterns after photo development,
process bias may be determined prior to etching.  Unlike previous use
of similar test patterns to measure bias in etched conductive films,
measurement of conductive photoresist patterns permits rework of
unsatisfactory photo processing.  An insulating film, e.g., an
anti-reflection coating, is applied over conductive films before
applying the conductive photoresist.

      Any of the conductive photoresists developed to reduce or
eliminate charging may be used to create electrically measureable
photoresist test patterns such as those previously used to
electrically measure process bias, defect density, or overlay
accuracy of etched conductors.  This process permits such
measurements to be made as part of the control of processes to
pattern insulating layers.

      When conductive photoresist patterns are used over a conductive
material, an insulating layer must be interposed. A multilayer
photoresist having a non-conductive first layer is suitable.
Anti-reflection coatings frequently used over metal films to be
etched are generally good insulators. Bias measurements made of the
photoresist pattern may now be compared with bias measurements made
of an underlying conductive film pattern formed by the measured photo
pattern.  This allows separation of photo process bi...