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Enhancement of Critical Current in High Tc Material

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119464D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Clarke, DR: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for increasing the critical current of high temperature superconductors. Inclusions of paramagnetic or ferromagnetic crystal grains are introduced within a sample of a high transition temperature is that the magnetic grains will attract and hold the magnetic fluxoids that are known to penetrate all such Type II superconducting materials. Since the critical current is the current which causes fluxoids to move, enhanced fluxoid pinning should enhance the transport critical current.

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Enhancement of Critical Current in High Tc Material

      Disclosed is a method for increasing the critical current of
high temperature superconductors.  Inclusions of paramagnetic or
ferromagnetic crystal grains are introduced within a sample of a high
transition temperature is that the magnetic grains will attract and
hold the magnetic fluxoids that are known to penetrate all such Type
II superconducting materials.  Since the critical current is the
current which causes fluxoids to move, enhanced fluxoid pinning
should enhance the transport critical current.

      One configuration for a polycrystalline thin film is material,
and attracted to the grains that have the substituted holmium.  All
the grains are superconducting, despite the presence of holmium, but
the high magnetization of the holmium material traps and holds the
fluxoids, thereby enhancing the critical current.

      This technique is not suitable for other superconductors, since
the inclusion of paramagnetic or ferromagnetic material is
detrimental to superconductivity elements are crystallographically
arranged so that the substitution of holmium for the yttrium, for
example, can produce strong paramagnetism without substantially
altering the superconductivity transition.

      This technique should be applicable to polycrystalline films,
single crystal films (magnetically doped), and bulk material, such as
ceramics and plasma arc-coated samples. It may be particularly useful
in polycr...