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Use of Pressure to Measure Film Adhesion On Substrate

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119602D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chan, H: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

With the development of VLSI multilevel interconnection technology, the adhesion of thin metallic films to substrates, insulators or dielectric films is of growing importance over the past few years, as adhesion becomes one of the predominant factors governing the reliability and durability of the multilevel interconnection. This is a particular problem if the film or substrate is subject to corrosion or a humid atmosphere, such as the case of copper (Cu) on polymer, since under these circumstances any tendency for the metallic film to peel off from the insulator or dielectric substrate may well be aggravated.

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Use of Pressure to Measure Film Adhesion On Substrate

      With the development of VLSI multilevel interconnection
technology, the adhesion of thin metallic films to substrates,
insulators or dielectric films is of growing importance over the past
few years, as adhesion becomes one of the predominant factors
governing the reliability and durability of the multilevel
interconnection.  This is a particular problem if the film or
substrate is subject to corrosion or a humid atmosphere, such as the
case of copper (Cu) on polymer, since under these circumstances any
tendency for the metallic film to peel off from the insulator or
dielectric substrate may well be aggravated. However, the existing
engineering techniques of measuring adhesion (bending, squashing,
abrasion, heating/quenching, indentation, pulling and peeling) are
rather crude and it is difficult to obtain more than comparative
values by these methods (*).

      Disclosed is a novel approach to measuring the adhesion of
metallic films by applying pressure to blister and peel off these
metal films from the insulator or substrate.  This design consists of
two pressure chambers, A and B.  Chamber A is used as a gas reservoir
to connect to chamber B which holds the sample, as shown in Fig. 1.
At the end of chamber B, a hollow device structure is clamped (see
Fig.  2), and as the pressure is increased, the metal film blisters.
The change of angle from the metal blister is detected by the image
of a 5-milliwa...