Browse Prior Art Database

Architecture for WDMA Networks Using Tunable Receivers And Forwarding

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119606D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 85K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Auerbach, J: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a logical organization for Wavelength Division Multiple Access (WDMA) optical networks, whose physical organization is a broadcast star.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Architecture for WDMA Networks Using Tunable Receivers And Forwarding

      This article describes a logical organization for
Wavelength Division Multiple Access (WDMA) optical networks, whose
physical organization is a broadcast star.

      We assume that there are at least as many wavelength channels
as there are stations (plus one additional channel for control), and
that every station is equipped with two fixed transmitters, one fixed
receiver, and two (or more) tunable receivers. The problem is to
route packets from any source station to any destination station in
an efficient fashion.  Previous solutions for similar configurations
include (1), which uses only tuning of receivers (and requires only
one tunable receiver per station) and (2), which uses only multihop
forwarding of packets (and permits all receivers to be fixed). The
former scheme is limited to components which can tune in a fraction
of the time it takes a packet to travel through the network (still
technologically difficult); the latter scheme has an average number
of hops which is a function of the number of stations installed on
the network rather than the number of stations actively transmitting
to each other.  The present scheme avoids both disadvantages.

      One transmitter and the fixed receiver in each station is tuned
to a common wavelength, which is time-divided between stations and
serves as a control channel.  In this channel each station broadcasts
the status of all receivers and also makes requests to other stations
for retuning of receivers.  Each station's second transmitter
transmits on a wavelength unique to that station.   All data packets
contain source-routed headers giving a complete path (in terms of
intermediate and final station addresses) to the destination.
Stations assist each other in forwarding packets according to
information in the header.

      Processing in the source distinguishes between the first packet
of a "burst" and other packets in the burst. A burst continues as
long as...