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Browse Prior Art Database

"Smart" Cable Enclosure/Connector

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119634D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 111K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mirabella, GM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a device that will allow the user to easily connect between a specific communication protocol interface, contained within a computer, and the user's specific external network. This can be accomplished without removing the computer covers, provided that the appropriate adapter card is plugged into the computer.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

"Smart" Cable Enclosure/Connector

      Disclosed is a device that will allow the user to easily
connect between a specific communication protocol interface,
contained within a computer, and the user's specific external
network.  This can be accomplished without removing the computer
covers, provided that the appropriate adapter card is plugged into
the computer.

      Presently, for one computer to communicate with another within
a certain network, a specific communications standard, or protocol,
must be followed.  There are numerous protocols available and each
protocol requires a distinct set of hardware to effect the proper
processing of information.  In any particular network, two or more
computers can communicate only if they possess the appropriate
hardware.  Communication within other networks using different
protocols is possible provided appropriate hardware is available for
each protocol.

      Communications hardware is typically in the form of a printed
circuit card (a daughter card) mounted to a main or mother board with
in the chassis of the computer itself.  This daughter card, which is
valid for only one protocol, is connected to the network via an
external connector and cable.  Some computers may allow the potential
for additional protocols and, hence, additional networks.  However,
if the user wishes to change protocols, this requires the removal of
the computer covers and the replacement of the daughter card.  The
problem then becomes obvious as the user seeks routine communication
on more protocols than his computer can support.  Regardless of how
many protocols can be supported it becomes burdensome if one more is
required.  Continuous cover removal to exchange daughter cards is a
burdensome task and supplying hardware for every possible protocol is
both cost and space prohibitive.

      Since certain elements of each protocol daughter card are
common, these may be grouped together on a generic daughter card,
i.e., an adapter card.  Certain other elements are discrete to each
protocol.  Also, the cable, with various types of conductors and the
network standard connector, are distinct elements.  By g...