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Mains Test Signal Generation by Vector Addition of Coherent Sine Waves

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119648D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hayward, M: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A mains test supply source which supplies programmable defects under control of a PC to simulate power line disturbances is described. A single sine wave input is discriminated via Op-amp/inverter hardware into 3-phases, through summing networks. These allow complete control of a range of output AC voltages with the addition of transients to the AC lines. Operation is simple and quick with automatic recording.

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Mains Test Signal Generation by Vector Addition of Coherent Sine Waves

      A mains test supply source which supplies programmable
defects under control of a PC to simulate power line disturbances is
described.  A single sine wave input is discriminated via
Op-amp/inverter hardware into 3-phases, through summing networks.
These allow complete control of a range of output AC voltages with
the addition of transients to the AC lines.  Operation is simple and
quick with automatic recording.

      Equipment to be subjected to Power Line Disturbance testing is
powered from a large linear amplifier.  The low-voltage amplifier
source holds the mains and modulating disturbance information.  In
the present example the common source of mains and disturbance is a
single sine-wave generated in a personal computer (PC).  Three-phase
generation is catered for by phase shifting and summing operations on
the sine-wave, but a single-phase scheme is described below.

      A PC-based source system has the advantage that a menu-based
program may be used to control the test signal generation and
automated data handling.  The mix of clean and disturbed mains is
made in the vector card to be described below.

      A low-level sinusoidal signal is generated by a DAC card in the
PC.  This sinusoidal signal is then fed to the vector card.

      A block diagram of the vector card is shown in Fig. 1. In the
card the single sine-wave input is extended to three parallel op-ampp
paths:
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