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Browse Prior Art Database

Method of Air Bearing Surface Inspection for an Actuator Assembly

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119699D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 78K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, JS: AUTHOR

Abstract

Described is a device used to inspect the air bearing surface (ABS) of the heads at the actuator assembly level using axial illumination. The ABS could have been damaged or contaminated during the assembly process.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 59% of the total text.

Method of Air Bearing Surface Inspection for an Actuator Assembly

      Described is a device used to inspect the air bearing
surface (ABS) of the heads at the actuator assembly level using axial
illumination.  The ABS could have been damaged or contaminated during
the assembly process.

      This device uses an axially illuminated microscope which will
produce a good reflected image when the object being viewed is tilted
up to 5 degrees with respect to the optical axis.  The microscope
being used is a Wild Leitz m420 with a working distance of 39 mm and
a numerical aperture of 0.23.  The normal magnification used will be
30x.  (This microscope has been used for ABS inspect during slider
and head build.)

      The optical axis is folded 90 degrees below the microscope 1 by
a 45-degree mirror 2 placed next to the ABS 3 of the slider 4 (Fig.
1).  Because the mirror surface 2 is small in a vertical sense, only
one rail of the ABS 3 can be viewed at a time.  By moving the
slider 4 vertically, each rail of the ABS 3 can be inspected (Fig.
2).  This does not change the focus.

      This mirror 2 is a surface polished at 45 degrees on a thin
beam.  These beams are slightly thinner than the recording disk used
in the file to prevent damage to the sliders.  As many mirrors as are
needed to inspect all sliders in an actuator stack can be used (Fig.
3).  When these thin beams are polished on opposite edges at 45
degrees, the mirror assembly can be rotated...