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Toner Powder Flow And Jump Gap Behavior

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119738D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Marshall, GP: AUTHOR

Abstract

The use of the jump development method is well known in the electrophotographic art. In this embodiment, a monocomponent, magnetic toner is induced to cross an air gap from a toner source (usually a developer roller filled with magnets) to a second surface (a photoconductive or any intermediate surface) under the influence of applied fields. Transfer may be conducted in a similar manner. The efficiency of this process and the quality of the resulting image have been described in terms of field characteristics rather than toner properties.

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Toner Powder Flow And Jump Gap Behavior

      The use of the jump development method is well known in the
electrophotographic art.  In this embodiment, a monocomponent,
magnetic toner is induced to cross an air gap from a toner source
(usually a developer roller filled with magnets) to a second surface
(a photoconductive or any intermediate surface) under the influence
of applied fields. Transfer may be conducted in a similar manner.
The efficiency of this process and the quality of the resulting image
have been described in terms of field characteristics rather than
toner properties.

      Disclosed herein is the toner property necessary to enable the
jump gap method of transfer to be employed, particularly when
monocomponent, nonmagnetic toner is used and specifically when
impression development has been employed.

      To develop (or transfer), the toner interparticle interaction
must be reduced so that toner may become airborne.  One method to
reduce the interparticle attraction is the surface addition of
extraparticulate additives.  This interparticle attraction may be
quantified by measurement of the toner powder flow characteristics,
angle of repose or any other suitable method.  If this property is
adjusted correctly, toner transfer may be achieved under the
circumstances described above.  For example, when a toner without the
property adjustment described above is subjected to transfer across a
gap, no transfer will be noted.  Upon the addition...