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Method for Determination of Glass Concentration in Screened Thick Film Ink

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119760D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Andris, GS: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Significant process control capability is obtained by using near infrared reflectance analysis (NIRA) to measure the concentration of glass in dried ceramic patterns on ceramic tape, and thus ensure that the correct paste was used. An algorithm using the NIRA absorption intensities at several near infrared wavelengths provides the concentration directly. This is remarkable, because neither the glass nor the metal in the dried paste has significant absorption in the near infrared, and the concentration of organics in the dried paste does not change from paste to paste. Although the screened paste covers only a small fraction of the tape's surface area and the tape contains the same glass as the paste does, adequate sensitivity is found with this technique to discriminate pastes differing by 5% in total glass content.

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Method for Determination of Glass Concentration in Screened Thick
Film Ink

      Significant process control capability is obtained by using
near infrared reflectance analysis (NIRA) to measure the
concentration of glass in dried ceramic patterns on ceramic tape, and
thus ensure that the correct paste was used.  An algorithm using the
NIRA absorption intensities at several near infrared wavelengths
provides the concentration directly.  This is remarkable, because
neither the glass nor the metal in the dried paste has significant
absorption in the near infrared, and the concentration of organics in
the dried paste does not change from paste to paste.  Although the
screened paste covers only a small fraction of the tape's surface
area and the tape contains the same glass as the paste does, adequate
sensitivity is found with this technique to discriminate pastes
differing by 5% in total glass content.

      Disclosed anonymously.