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Lattice Match for Silicon Epitaxy

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119782D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Holtzberg, F: AUTHOR

Abstract

Materials which can be lattice-matched to silicon are of interest in semiconductor technology. The use of rare earth monosulfides for lattice matching is described, where these materials provide a substantially epitaxial match to silicon. These are face- centered cubic structures having a lattice which has dimensions near to and in some cases the same as that of the silicon diamond lattice. These materials are substrates for epitaxial growth of silicon on the conducting substrate, or epitaxial growth of metallic conducting lines on silicon.

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Lattice Match for Silicon Epitaxy

      Materials which can be lattice-matched to silicon are of
interest in semiconductor technology.  The use of rare earth
monosulfides for lattice matching is described, where these materials
provide a substantially epitaxial match to silicon.  These are face-
centered cubic structures having a lattice which has dimensions near
to and in some cases the same as that of the silicon diamond lattice.
These materials are substrates for epitaxial growth of silicon on the
conducting substrate, or epitaxial growth of metallic conducting
lines on silicon.

      Examples of these rare earth monosulfides include yttrium
monosulfide, dysprosium monosulfide, holmium monosulfide, erbium
monosulfide, thulium monosulfide, and lutetium monosulfide.  These
are refractory materials having melting points around 2300@C.  They
are stable in air and can be deposited as thin films using electron
beam evaporation onto a variety of substrates.  These compounds all
exist for a range of concentration which makes it possible to vary
the lattice constant approximately 0.02 Ao by changing stoichiometry.
In some cases, the variation in stoichiometry changes the lattice by
a much larger amount. This means that in those cases lattice matching
occurs by the composition self-adjusting at the surface to match the
substrate.  These materials cleave along 100 planes in single crystal
form, and provide surfaces which are sufficiently smooth for epitaxy.

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