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Electrophoretic Deposition of Nucleating Layers for Polycrystalline Diamond Film Deposition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119805D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 71K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cuomo, JJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is an electrophoretic diamond powder deposition method that gives a uniform seed deposition which increases the initial nucleation and growth rate of polycrystalline diamond films. This increase in nuclei uniformity results in a more uniform diamond film growth and decreases the thickness at which the films become continuous.

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Electrophoretic Deposition of Nucleating Layers for Polycrystalline
Diamond Film Deposition

      Disclosed is an electrophoretic diamond powder deposition
method that gives a uniform seed deposition which increases the
initial nucleation and growth rate of polycrystalline diamond films.
This increase in nuclei uniformity results in a more uniform diamond
film growth and decreases the thickness at which the films become
continuous.

      In the polycrystalline diamond film deposition by enhanced
plasma processes, nucleating layers are almost always deposited onto
the substrate prior to the film deposition.  This is usually a
critical step, since without it incubation times of up to several
hours [1] are usually required prior to the initiation of deposition.
Although fine diamond powders (10 to 30 mm in size) are usually used
for this nucleating layer, other powders, such as cubic BN, TaC, SiC,
and the like (1), have been used.  Most workers in this field deposit
this powder by dipping the substrate into a suspension of the powder,
or by applying a drop of the suspension onto the substrate.  The
suspension is then dried.  These methods result in a very nonuniform
deposition of the powder.  Also, in drying, the surface tension of
the liquid tends to cause the powder to agglomerate.  Some workers
then press the diamond powder into the substrate for better adhesion.
Having the pH of the suspension in the 8-9 range reduces the
agglomeration of the diamond powders in the suspension.

      Electrophoretic deposition of diamond powder onto the
substrates results in a denser and more uniform deposit than the drip
or drop method.  A suspension of the diamo...