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Hot Metal MIRP Process by Silylation of Resist

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119807D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Amborski, DJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A silylation lift-off process is described in this article which incorporates silicon into the molecular structure of the lift-off resist, thereby increasing its temperature stability and decreasing distortion of the lift-off structure.

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Hot Metal MIRP Process by Silylation of Resist

      A silylation lift-off process is described in this
article which incorporates silicon into the molecular structure of
the lift-off resist, thereby increasing its temperature stability and
decreasing distortion of the lift-off structure.

      The MIRP (Modified Image Reversal Process) process for lift-off
is limited by the thermal instability of the resist, post develop.
MIRP processing at 150@C-20@C metal deposition temperatures was not
found practical, the high temperatures distorting normal MIRP
lift-off structures. Plasma hardening and deep UV exposure to
stabilize the resist against reflow were not found completely
effective against reflow.  For these reasons, the costlier, more
complicated (greater number of operations) barrier lift-off process
is employed.  This process utilizes bake temperatures of the underlay
photoresist resist that exceed 200@C.

      Silylated photoresist is thermally stable to N 400@C;
therefore, the use of fully silylated MIRP resist would allow the
user to employ hot metal evaporation deposition temperatures.
However, the difficulties involved in silylating MIRP resist are
twofold:
   1.   The resin in MIRP TNS is Kodak (a single insomer cresol/
formaldehyde), making it difficult (due to the high packing density
of the resist) to get the solvent attack on the resist necessary for
silylation to take place, and
   2.   The imidizote initiator, a crosslinking to the res...