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Vapor/Reflux Silylation of Resist (Process Enhancement)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119809D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 78K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Amborski, DJ: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

This article describes a technique for optimizing the vapor/reflux silylation process for photoresist resulting in cleaner operating conditions and enabling the fast, efficient silylation of resist films.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 65% of the total text.

Vapor/Reflux Silylation of Resist (Process Enhancement)

      This article describes a technique for optimizing the
vapor/reflux silylation process for photoresist resulting in cleaner
operating conditions and enabling the fast, efficient silylation of
resist films.

      Earlier unsuccessful efforts to develop a satisfactory
silylation process for resists using the vapor phase have been
determined to be due to the conditions previously employed, e.g., (1)
a pure HMCTS reagent vapor applied in a heated vacuum, and (2)
vapor/reflux over a heated xylene/HMCTS solution.  The disclosed
technique, employing a modification of the conditions of (2), enables
the fast, efficient silylation of resist films while avoiding the
problems commonly encountered with the use of the liquid phase
silylation process, i.e., particle contamination during liquid
immersion, and the leaching out of resist elements into the
silylation bath.

      A vapor/liquid equilibrium diagram is shown in Fig. 1. Prior
attempts to use the vapor phase process were conducted employing
optimum liquid phase concentrations as the source for reflux.
Beginning with these concentrations, the vapor/liquid equilibria (see
Fig.  1) predicts that the reflux concentration of HMCTS (A) will be
extremely low, hence no silylation will occur in a reasonable period
of time, as indicated in Fig. 2, which shows the silylation rate as a
function of HMCTS liquid concentration (B).  The reflux concentration
of HMCTS ma...