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Selective Deposition of a Single Layer of Particles

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119877D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Liniger, EG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This method produces a densely covered, single layer of small particles on a smooth, flat surface (e.g., substrate) in selected patterns of micrometer or greater dimensions. Once obtained, the particles can be fused by sintering, chemical bonding, or other methods. The method involves five general steps: 1. Absorbing onto a surface 10 a polymeric flocculant from solution, forming a monomolecular layer 12 (Fig. 1). 2. Rinsing the surface with fresh solvent, which removes all excess polymer and then drying the surface to form a very thin layer of polymer 14 (Fig. 2). 3. Removing the polymer 14 from selected areas 16 on the surface by one of various means, such as by scribing or by the combined use of a mask 18 and exposure to sources such a UV, lasers, ions, or electrons to remove or degrade the polymer molecules (Fig. 3).

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Selective Deposition of a Single Layer of Particles

      This method produces a densely covered, single layer of
small particles on a smooth, flat surface (e.g., substrate) in
selected patterns of micrometer or greater dimensions. Once obtained,
the particles can be fused by sintering, chemical bonding, or other
methods.  The method involves five general steps:
1.   Absorbing onto a surface 10 a polymeric flocculant from
solution, forming a monomolecular layer 12 (Fig. 1).
2.   Rinsing the surface with fresh solvent, which removes all excess
polymer and then drying the surface to form a very thin layer of
polymer 14 (Fig. 2).
3.   Removing the polymer 14 from selected areas 16 on the surface by
one of various means, such as by scribing or by the combined use of a
mask 18 and exposure to sources such a UV, lasers, ions, or electrons
to remove or degrade the polymer molecules (Fig. 3).
4.   Re-immersing the surface into a suspension of fine particles 20
which bond to the polymeric flocculant molecules remaining on select
areas of the surface.  This forms a single layer of particles on the
areas where the polymer is still present.  Only one layer forms since
particles can be made not to stick to each other.  In the areas 16
where the polymer has been removed or degraded, little or no
particles are attached (Fig. 4).
5.   Rinsing the surface 10, removing the suspension and all excess
particles, leaving the single layer of particles on selected sites
(Fig. 5)....