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Browse Prior Art Database

Correlating Audio And Moving-Image Tracks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119905D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

de Nijs, R: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article discloses a process that automates the search for specific segments of continuously recorded data. Currently, these searches are done manually.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Correlating Audio And Moving-Image Tracks

      This article discloses a process that automates the
search for specific segments of continuously recorded data.
Currently, these searches are done manually.

      By correlating the voicetrack transcript from a film or video-
image track, each word from the voicetrack becomes associated with
the specific frame location from which it was transcribed.  Hence, a
transcription of word and frame locations comprises a database, which
is stored in memory (i.e., computer memory) to facilitate automated
searches.

      To retrieve data, the user searches the database by invoking
word or phrase arguments (queues), which are then correlated with
specific frame-locations (markers).  The film or video track is
advanced to a marker which corresponds to the initial search
argument.

      Although ideally suited to a word/phrase database, this process
is also applicable to any continuously recorded media that is
amenable to queue-and-sequence transcription.

      An example of a system which can search video tape consists of
a video tape player (equipped with a location counter), a voice
transcription system, and a processor capable of storing queues from
the transcription system and markers from the location counter.

      The voice transcription system attaches to the output of the
video tape player's audio output and to the processor's data input
(i.e., serial port, bus, etc.).  The video tape player's tape counter
also attaches to a processor's data input port.

      To begin the process, the tape advances to a starting queue,
and the counter is set to 00....