Browse Prior Art Database

Data Exchange for Telephone Company Oss Data Consolidation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000119939D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 5 page(s) / 163K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Boggs Jr, JK: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Today, telephone companies have many Operations Support Systems (OSS) that partially interconnect so that they have no means for writing applications that cross the individual OSSs.

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Data Exchange for Telephone Company

Oss

Data Consolidation

      Today, telephone companies have many Operations Support
Systems (OSS) that partially interconnect so that they have no means
for writing applications that cross the individual OSSs.

      This article specifically pertains to methods for accomplishing
database consolidation of very large databases without losing
real-time responsiveness to on-line queries and updates.  In
addition, a new

OSS

need not contain local data storage.

      Large, real-time, heterogeneous databases are consolidated for
dynamic distribution of database updates to distributed database
copies, and for creation of new overlapping distributed database
systems.  Multiple different telephone company OSSs are
interconnected to a Data Exchange (DE) using a telecommunications
network (TN).

      This is accomplished in large real-time database systems by
adding another level of a telecommunication-connected system called
the DE. In embodiments of the method, information contained in an OSS
is copied to the DE and, optionally, distributed to other OSSs to
achieve data consistency.

      Fig. 1 shows the interconnected distributed system structure
relating the real-time OSSs with the DE.  Fig. 2 shows the contents
of computer memory of the DE and products on which the DE depends,
i.e., NetView*, NDM, CICS, VTAM*, MVS/ESA*.  Fig. 3 shows the point
in the OSS processing where data is selected for transmission to the
DE and the kinds of processing involved.

      In Fig. 1, an existing OSS 1 is modified so that when database
modifications are made, the same updates are also transmitted via a
TN 2 to the DE 3.  The modifications to the existing OSS 1 entail
capturing the database updates within the existing OSS, in no way
formatting or processing these data, moving these data to
transmission buffers and transmitting these data to the DE.  Except
for the capture of the database updates, the existing OSS remains
unchanged and operates as it did before these extensions.

      TN 2 provides transport of the existing OSS 1 database update
data from the existing OSS to the DE.  The telecommunications network
does not modify or process these data and delivers to the DE the
existing OSS database update data as one continuous series of bytes
of data, regardless of intervening network processing.

      DE 3 receives the database update, removes selected fields of
information from these data, and updates the DE relational database.
With database update data received from multiple OSSs, the DE
database contains a consolidation of the data from these several
OSSs.  No timing dependency is defined between OSS database update
and when that same data arrives at the DE or when that same data is
placed in the DE database.

      New Administrative Applications 4 can now be executed using the
DE consolidated database.  New applications use data that was stored
previously in separate O...