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Better Method for Setter Tile Fabrication

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120003D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bezama, RJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article discloses an alternate sintering profile to the standard air sintering cycle for the fabrication of setter tiles. The alternate sintering profile produces higher strength tiles as well as higher yields. Setter tiles are porous alumina bodies achieved by controlled partial sintering of a mixture of alumina particles and a small fraction of glass frit. Historically, setter tiles are fabricated by firing alumina laminates in air at 1000oC, with appropriate ramps and soaks to control binder removal and minimize thermal stresses within each tile. A typical air-fired setter tile has 40-50% porosity and global camber of less than 3 mils.

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Better Method for Setter Tile Fabrication

      This article discloses an alternate sintering profile to
the standard air sintering cycle for the fabrication of setter tiles.
The alternate sintering profile produces higher strength tiles as
well as higher yields.  Setter tiles are porous alumina bodies
achieved by controlled partial sintering of a mixture of alumina
particles and a small fraction of glass frit.  Historically, setter
tiles are fabricated by firing alumina laminates in air at 1000oC,
with appropriate ramps and soaks to control binder removal and
minimize thermal stresses within each tile.  A typical air-fired
setter tile has 40-50% porosity and global camber of less than 3
mils.  However, the air sintering cycle has practical limitations,
due to the rapid binder removal, which limits the number of laminates
which can be fired at one time without the risk of sintering cracks.

      The alternate sintering cycle described here uses a steam
atmosphere, with appropriate ramps and soaks, to produce stronger
tiles at higher yields than the air sintering cycle.  The fundamental
elements of the alternate cycle are described in Fig. 1; however, as
gas flow rates and thermal gradients are strongly dependent on
furnace geometry and loading, the details of the cycle must be
experimentally determined for the particular furnace and application.
The use of steam in place of air reduces the rate of binder removal,
which allows a larger number of laminates to be...