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Measuring Critical Slider Location Using Optical Flat

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120049D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brooks, WW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method of measuring the slider location on a Head/Suspension Assembly (HSA) which offers a high degree of accuracy by simulating the actual working condition of the slider.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 63% of the total text.

Measuring Critical Slider Location Using Optical Flat

      Disclosed is a method of measuring the slider location on
a Head/Suspension Assembly (HSA) which offers a high degree of
accuracy by simulating the actual working condition of the slider.

      This method also reduces the possibility of damaging the
suspension because of stiction between the mirror finish of the
slider and the measurement tool optical glass through the use of a
special etching pattern in the slider-contact surface of the glass.

      Current measurement of slider location is done with the
suspension assemblies deflected into a fly height position with the
slider in a free state.  The slider, in the free state, is allowed a
pitch and roll of one degree.  If the slider is at the maximum limit
of either pitch or roll, its location could be off by as much as
0.007 mm, which is about 23 percent of the allowed tolerance band of
 0.03 mm.

      A new design was made to eliminate this effect and obtain a
tight (normal) distribution of the data.  A holding fixture was
designed and made in which the HSA is deflected into a fly height
position, with the slider being held at zero degrees as used in the
file. This was obtained by using an etched optical flat glass to hold
the slider flat (Fig. 1).

      Previous attempts in using optical flats on the slider created
a problem of wringing between the slider air-bearing surface and the
optical flat.  This wringing creates relatively l...