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Browse Prior Art Database

Pneumatic Chuck

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120050D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Wasser, K: AUTHOR

Abstract

In many applications where the surfaces of varying probes are to be investigated, such as in all kinds of scanning microscopy, it is important that during investigation the probes be retained in a rigid position with respect to the other parts of the microscope while still being easily exchangeable. Preferably, the probe holder should be operable under ultra-high vacuum conditions.

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Pneumatic Chuck

      In many applications where the surfaces of varying probes
are to be investigated, such as in all kinds of scanning microscopy,
it is important that during investigation the probes be retained in a
rigid position with respect to the other parts of the microscope
while still being easily exchangeable.  Preferably, the probe holder
should be operable under ultra-high vacuum conditions.

      This chuck comprises two jaws 1 and 2 pivotally connected at a
joint 3. Each jaw has a recess 4, 5 for receiving the (cylindrical)
probe.  A bellows 6 is arranged in a cavity 7 and connected via a
hose 8 to a source of pressurized gas, such as air, for example.
Inflation of bellows 6 causes the jaws 1 and 2 to close and thus
fasten the probe positioned inside recesses 4 and 5.  Releasing the
pressure in bellows 6 causes tension spring 9 to take over and to
automatically contract rear portions 10 and 11.  This results in the
pivoting of jaws 1 and 2 about joint 3 and, consequently, the opening
of the chuck.

      Appropriate dimensioning of the bellows 6 and the adjustment of
the gas pressure permit adaptation of the holding forces to the
application on hand. Designing the recesses 4 and 5 in such a way
that as much as possible of the probe is in contact with the jaws 1
and 2 provides for optimum heat transfer.