Browse Prior Art Database

Piezoelectrically Aimed Laser

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120072D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 113K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Shott, FA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a design and method for building an optoelectronic transmitter package utilizing piezoelectric crystals to position or aim a light-emitting device (LASER or LED) into a LENS/FIBER focusing and/or transmission system.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Piezoelectrically Aimed Laser

      Disclosed is a design and method for building an
optoelectronic transmitter package utilizing piezoelectric crystals
to position or aim a light-emitting device (LASER or LED) into a
LENS/FIBER focusing and/or transmission system.

      This scheme can provide a maximum device to LENS/FIBER
coupling, thereby providing maximum power coupling into the
LENS/FIBER light transmission media, or it can be used to decouple a
LASER for a FIBER, preventing radiation from coupling into an open
fiber.  This can be used to insure LASER Safety Compliance.  The
piezoelectric crystals provide precision sub-micron movement
consistent with the needs of these types of devices and their
assembly tolerance.  The capability to aim a LASER or LED to a LENS
or FIBER compensates for these tolerances, thereby simplifying
manufacture and reducing cost.

      1.   This method provides capability to point or aim a LASER
beam in x, y and z directions (note Z direction piezoelectric crystal
chip not shown in the attached diagrams but can easily be
incorporated).

      2.   This method can be used in a non-fiber optical cable
application where 3-dimensional positioning, alignment and focusing
of a LASER or light beam is needed.

      3.   The rear LASER facet photodetector array chip allows the
relative position of the LASER aiming to be monitored.  This scheme
allows the beam position vs. piezoelectric bias to be characterized
during manufacture and then used in a system configuration to point
or align the beam based on monitor diode array feedback.

      4.   This active LASER alignment capability can be used to
compensate for operating drift conditions due to temperature,
mechanical or noise-induced changes in the active devices or
packaging components.

      5.   This design allows connected optoelectronic modules which
can compensate for the connector and fiber manufacturing tolerances.
Current methods utilize costly precision manufacturing techniques to
guarantee the best possible alignment and minimal tolerance which
results in a small window of suitable operation.  With an actively
aligned LASER, component members can be assembled with greater
tolerances and less expensively, then actively aligned on an
individual basis in their final environ...