Browse Prior Art Database

Remote Computer Control by Keyboard Emulation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120087D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Levine, JL: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A method is disclosed for remote control of a computer by a second computer. Electrical signals are fed into the keyboard jack of the controlled computer to exactly simulate any sequence of operator keystrokes. As a result, programs intended for keyboard control by a human operator can be run without modification, if human response times are replaced by suitable delays. Further, the method does not rely on special features of the operating system installed in the controlled computer.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 78% of the total text.

Remote Computer Control by Keyboard Emulation

      A method is disclosed for remote control of a computer by
a second computer.  Electrical signals are fed into the keyboard jack
of the controlled computer to exactly simulate any sequence of
operator keystrokes.  As a result, programs intended for keyboard
control by a human operator can be run without modification, if human
response times are replaced by suitable delays.  Further, the method
does not rely on special features of the operating system installed
in the controlled computer.

      Many computer keyboards contain a dedicated microprocessor
which scans a matrix of switches closed by the keys.  The
microprocessor detects contact closures and sends the information to
the computer according to a specified communication protocol.

      A convenient way to send simulated keystrokes and handle the
communication protocol is to use an actual keyboard chip.  A suitable
circuit, consisting of 3 main blocks denoted by dotted lines, is
shown in the figure on the following page.

      Block I contains the keyboard chip and support components.
Block II consists primarily of a set of data registers which connect
to the drive and sense pins of the keyboard chip to simulate a switch
matrix.  Switch closures are simulated electrically by setting or
clearing specific latch bits.  Block III is an interface which allows
the controlling computer to load data into the registers.  The data
to be loaded is prov...