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Technique for Adjusting MIDI Instrument Assignments in an Audio Editor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120146D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 4 page(s) / 172K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Beitel, BJ: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

The most needed editing function for Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) files is adjustments to MIDI instrument assignments. This technique allows non-musicians to make these changes in a simple direct fashion without the use of a MIDI sequencer, or a detailed knowledge of the MIDI protocol.

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Technique for Adjusting MIDI Instrument Assignments in an Audio Editor

      The most needed editing function for Musical Instrument
Digital Interface (MIDI) files is adjustments to MIDI instrument
assignments.  This technique allows non-musicians to make these
changes in a simple direct fashion without the use of a MIDI
sequencer, or a detailed knowledge of the MIDI protocol.

      In a system allowing limited MIDI editing capabilities, the
function to change MIDI instrument assignments is very important.
The implementation of this critical MIDI editing function allows non-
musicians to have the ability to make voice assignment changes
without having to learn to use a complex MIDI sequencer.  This
function allows the user to correct the instrument assignments so
they will correctly sound on a fixed instrument assignment
synthesizer (i.e., one where a specific MIDI instrument number is
always associated with a specific instrument sound).  In addition,
this function will allow the user to alter MIDI files so the same
files can be made to sound differently, thereby greatly increasing
the usability of the user's MIDI music library.

      The most critical editing function for limited MIDI editing
implemented is the assignment (change and addition) of MIDI
instrument sounds to MIDI channels.  Consider a system that provided
a limited MIDI editing capability to support non-musicians using MIDI
music.  This limited editing is designed to be used by non-musicians,
unlike the currently existing MIDI editors (sequencers), and is also
designed to be as consistent as possible with the already established
simple digital audio editing.  The addition of the ability to
introduce changes to the instrument sound to MIDI channel assignments
is key to meeting the objectives of simple MIDI editing, and maximum
usability of existing MIDI files.  This function is made available
through a function (illustrated here with a menu) with critical
information as to instrument assignment status, along with an option
to introduce changes.

      The information needed to support this function is presented to
the user on a menu as illustrated in Fig. 1. This function is
illustrated in a menu that specifies from left to right five fields:
  1.) "MIDI Chan" identifies the MIDI channel with which the column
(four fields to the immediate right) is associated.
  2.) "Notes Exist" specifies if any notes (MIDI sound-producing
events) exist in the MIDI file following the current point in the
file.
  3.) "Assignment at This Point" specifies if the instrument sound
assignment for this channel is made at the current point in the MIDI
file or if it is being carried over from a previous as       signment
or the system default (e.g., "Piano").
  4.) "Effective MIDI Instrument (Voice)" specifies the instrument
sound that is in effect for the associated channel at the current
point in the MIDI file, regardless of whether or not the instrument
assignment...