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Browse Prior Art Database

Pluggable/Removable Cube of Chips Packaging Method

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120149D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bertin, CL: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

By gluing a stack of integrated circuit chips together and having input/output (I/O) pads exposed on chip edges as described in U.S. Patent 4,525,921, a very dense "cube" of chips is formed. Then, by contacting the exposed pads by means of silicon chips containing "fuzz button" contacts (described in Published European Patent Application 314,437) pluggable and removable high density packaging is achieved. Easy pluggability is useful in testing and in cube replacement during system repair.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 95% of the total text.

Pluggable/Removable Cube of Chips Packaging Method

      By gluing a stack of integrated circuit chips together
and having input/output (I/O) pads exposed on chip edges as described
in U.S.  Patent 4,525,921, a very dense "cube" of chips is formed.
Then, by contacting the exposed pads by means of silicon chips
containing "fuzz button" contacts (described in Published European
Patent Application 314,437) pluggable and removable high density
packaging is achieved. Easy pluggability is useful in testing and in
cube replacement during system repair.

      Referring to Fig. 1, a fuzz button (FB) contact is comprised of
a beveled hole etched in silicon 10 and filled with, e.g.,
gold-plated beryllium copper wool 12.  A chip containing many FB
contacts may then be pressed into contact with edge I/O pads of a
chip cube temporarily as in a fixture for chip cube testing.  A FB
contact chip may be made a part of a chip cube by gluing it in
place after contact is made with the I/O pads, as shown in Fig. 2,
thereby making stacked cube packaging possible.

      Referring to Fig. 2, each of the chip cubes 14 have FB chips 16
which make contact with chip edge I/O pads (not shown) and are glued
in place on two edges of each cube 14. The remaining two connection
edges of cubes 14 have exposed I/O pads which connect through FB
chips that are a part of either an adjacent cube or a next level of
wiring.  Thus, a very dense system package can be assembled by
pressing such a stac...