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Display of MIDI Text Fields in a Generalized Audio Editor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120150D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 81K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lisle, RJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Information in Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) text fields will often be of value for non-MIDI users trying to get MIDI files to play correctly when using a generalized audio editor that supports limited, simplified MIDI editing.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Display of MIDI Text Fields in a Generalized Audio Editor

      Information in Musical Instrument Digital Interface
(MIDI) text fields will often be of value for non-MIDI users trying
to get MIDI files to play correctly when using a generalized audio
editor that supports limited, simplified MIDI editing.

      The architected file structure MIDI supports several free-form
text fields.  These fields can optionally contain information added
by the musician which could be helpful to the  user in editing and
playing his MIDI files.  This information can be extracted and
displayed to aid the non-musician MIDI user.  The text material is
included as audio comments, including an appropriate header or title
which identifies the source of the MIDI text field and indicates any
automatic processing done utilizing the associated text.

      The MIDI file architecture supports the following free-form
text fields, which are described within the set of constructs known
as Meta-Events:
  1.) Text Event
  2.) Copyright Notice
  3.) Sequence/Track Name
  4.) Instrument Name
  5.) Lyric
  6.) Cue Point

      The intent of each of these fields is rather well described in
the official MIDI documentation.  Currently, most full-function MIDI
editors (called sequencers) use these text fields rather
indiscriminately; however, generally they contain the information
that was intended, and in the future, they will likely be more
consistently and extensively used.  This will be especially true for
limited-function MIDI editing. Since the user of a basic audio editor
will most likely not have...