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Display of MIDI Files to Aid Conventional Editing in a Generalized Audio Editor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120152D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 4 page(s) / 131K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lisle, RJ: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Limited Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) editing (i.e., that which does not give direct access to the MIDI data) needs some visual clues to allow the non-musician to edit MIDI file using conventional audio editing functions.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Display of MIDI Files to Aid Conventional Editing in a Generalized
Audio Editor

      Limited Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI)
editing (i.e., that which does not give direct access to the MIDI
data) needs some visual clues to allow the non-musician to edit MIDI
file using conventional audio editing functions.

      It is proposed that visual indicators be provided to aid non-
musicians in editing MIDI files when using a generalized audio
editor.  Users unfamiliar with MIDI file structure and who want to
use the generalized audio editor functions to make basic
modifications to MIDI files need some high-level cues as to the
approximate locations of specific MIDI commands.

      In this system, sound level (amplitude) is shown for sampled
digital audio by a row of box shaped indicators associated with each
displayed time segment.  This sound level display is illustrated Fig.
1, where the "Sound" column contains indications of the recorded
level of the digital audio.  The rightmost of the six indicators
(colored black) indicates that clipping occurred when the audio was
originally recorded.

      In the generalized audio editor, MIDI files may be played and
edited, as well as sampled digital audio files. To aid in the MIDI
editing, it is desirable to provide the user with some visual aids to
indicate the contents of the MIDI file.  These visual indicators
could be represented in many ways, but in this proposal they are
represented using the existing volume level indicators (which have no
obvious carry-over meaning from sampled digital audio to MIDI).  The
basic indications that are presented to the user are a summary status
for the displayed MIDI data.  In the generalized audio editor, this
may be at some mean- ingful time increment (e.g., 1 second or 0.1
second).  The status values and their visual display utilizing the
"Sound" indicators are as follows:
      1.) No boxes showing (i.e., of the leftmost four) indicates
silence (i.e., no MIDI note playing, or any other MIDI event in
progress during the associated time interval (e.g., 1 sec or 0.1
sec)).
      2.) One box (leftmost) showing indicates that any type of start
MIDI event, except "note on", is in progress (i.e., one or more MIDI
start events (e.g., "sustain on") occurred in a
          block prior to this point and the associated stops (e.g.,
"sustain off" has not been encountered through this point).
      3.) Two boxes (leftmost) showing indicates t...