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Maintaining Dimensional Stability During Lamination

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120171D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Poetzinger, JL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a strategy for maintaining the dimensional stability of thin film structures during lamination at high temperatures and pressures.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 87% of the total text.

Maintaining Dimensional Stability During Lamination

      Disclosed is a strategy for maintaining the dimensional
stability of thin film structures during lamination at high
temperatures and pressures.

      Thin film structures may contain a sheet of metal upon which
polymer dielectric and circuitization patterns are built in the
manufacture of thin film electronic packaging. This metal sheet acts
to increase the stiffness and dimensional stability of the layer.
High temperature lamination processes may be used to apply dielectric
layers to these thin film structures and/or to join these structures
together or join them to a stiff substrate.  The pressures and
temperatures used in these laminations can result in dimensional
instability (distortion, growth, shrinkage) which would result in the
inability to align features on these layers to features on other
layers or on the substrate.

      Our strategy for eliminating this instability has three main
components:  1)  Metal sheets and plates used as lay-up materials
within the lamination press stack should have Coefficients of Thermal
Expansion (CTE) matching that of the metal sheets within the thin
film parts.  This will minimize stresses induced on the part during
temperature ramps.  2) Low pressure should be used during temperature
ramps to allow slip to occur.  Slipping allows for stress relief
without stretching, compressing or distorting the thin film part.  3)
Compliant cushioning material should...