Browse Prior Art Database

Integrated Aperture Heater for Charged Particle Instruments

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120173D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gordon, MS: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is an integrated heater for either probe-forming or beam-limiting apertures. Heating apertures to sufficiently high temperature reduces both the amount of surface contamination and unwanted beam deflection by the charging of the non-conducting contaminants. Thermal and mechanical contact problems between resistive heating elements and apertures are eliminated by use of an integrated heater.

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Integrated Aperture Heater for Charged Particle Instruments

      Disclosed is an integrated heater for either probe-forming or
beam-limiting apertures.  Heating apertures to sufficiently high
temperature reduces both the amount of surface contamination and
unwanted beam deflection by the charging of the non-conducting
contaminants.  Thermal and mechanical contact problems between
resistive heating elements and apertures are eliminated by use of an
integrated heater.

      Aperture patterns can be defined lithographically and etched
through thin silicon membranes.  A heavy metal (or combination of
metals) is deposited on both sides of the membrane to provide
encapsulation and high stopping power from the impinging beam.  Using
the metal layers as ohmic contacts, current is passed through the
membrane.  The heat produced is concentrated in the membrane portion
of the aperture.  The figure shows a patterned aperture with metal
deposited on the outer surfaces, and a constant current power supply
connected to the ohmic contacts.

      Apertures formed in metals by either punching or electron
discharge machining (EDM) can be heated by the method described here
by deposition of a resistive layer on one surface followed by
deposition of a conductive material.

      Disclosed anonymously.