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Intuitive Desktop for OS/2 Standard Edition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120231D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 4 page(s) / 132K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Amro, HY: AUTHOR

Abstract

Running many applications in windows on the OS/2* Extended Edition desktop will clutter the screen with open windows and distort concentration on the task at hand. The different windows on the desktop overlay each other since the desktop is limited to the available physical space on the screen and does not include means of intuitive organization.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Intuitive Desktop for OS/2 Standard Edition

      Running many applications in windows on the OS/2*
Extended Edition desktop will clutter the screen with open windows
and distort concentration on the task at hand.  The different windows
on the desktop overlay each other since the desktop is limited to the
available physical space on the screen and does not include means of
intuitive organization.

      The desktop is what the user sees when booting OS/2. The screen
is given a background color against which the user is presented with
the following:
   1) The DOS and Print Manager icons on the bottom of the screen.
   2) The Desktop Manager window containing available program groups.
   3) The Main Group window containing available programs in the
group.

      The user can either invoke programs from their icons on the
bottom of the screen or from programs in either of the visible
windows.  Once the user has invoked an application, the given program
can either appear as a window on the screen or run as a full-screen
application.  The full-screen programs indicate their presence on the
desktop by appearing as icons.  If the user decides to minimize an
application running in a window, the application will also indicate
its presence on the desktop by appearing as an icon on the bottom of
the desktop. The user can open (run) multiple applications as windows
on the desktop, the corresponding windows will overlay each other
with only one window highlighted.  The user can switch between the
different application windows in three ways:
   1) By clicking on the corresponding window (if part of it is
visible), which will cause it to come to the top of the other windows
and be highlighted.
   2) By pressing CTRL_ESC, the user is presented with a task list
window that contains all the currently active applications.  The user
can use this window to switch to another application window
(regardless if parts of it are visible or not).
   3) By pressing Alt_Esc, A different window will be highlighted
every time Alt_Esc is pressed.

      In order to present the user with a larger and more intuitive
interface the following changes to the shell are proposed.
   Increase the size of the desktop, call it a "virtual desktop".  If
the size of the current desktop is X, which is the size of the
physical screen, the virtual desktop will be X * N, where N is an
even number greater than zero.  N will be limited by the amount of
available dynamic memory and performance issues concerning response
time.
If, for example, a value of 6 is used, the user will get a desktop
that is six times as big as the physical screen arranged in two rows
of three screens, the visible desktop will initially be located at
the lower center of the virtual desktop. In this case it would be row
two and column two.  As shown in Fig. 1, the loc...