Browse Prior Art Database

Request/Resume Commands With Intervening Gets/Sets

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120328D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dunn, JC: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a new feature to a Common Program Interface. (See the SAA Common Programming Interface Query Reference for a detailed description of the existing interface.) The new feature is a set of two commands called 'REQUEST' and 'RESUME'. The 'REQUEST' command is issued from the Query Manager and interrupts processing until a 'RESUME' command is issued from the calling application. The calling application can then obtain control and process the request. The only form of communication between the calling application and the Query Manager that is valid between 'REQUEST' and 'RESUME' commands are 'SET' and 'GET' commands, which are issued from the calling application. The result is that the calling application is available to process requests from the Query Manager at any time.

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Request/Resume Commands With Intervening Gets/Sets

      Disclosed is a new feature to a Common Program Interface.
(See the SAA Common Programming Interface Query Reference for a
detailed description of the existing interface.)  The new feature is
a set of two commands called 'REQUEST' and 'RESUME'.  The 'REQUEST'
command is issued from the Query Manager and interrupts processing
until a 'RESUME' command is issued from the calling application.  The
calling application can then obtain control and process the request.
The only form of communication between the calling application and
the Query Manager that is valid between 'REQUEST' and 'RESUME'
commands are 'SET' and 'GET' commands, which are issued from the
calling application. The result is that the calling application is
available to process requests from the Query Manager at any time.
The communication protocol for this type of request is clearly
defined.

      In this way, the calling application can more readily process
exceptions.  For example, if some type of recoverable error is
encountered deeply nested in some procedure which is initiated from a
calling application through the CPI, then the Query Manager can
suspend process-ing by issuing a 'REQUEST' command.  The calling
application can then take some action to correct the error, notify
the host Query Manager of the action taken via a 'SET' command, and
then pass control back to the host Query Manager via a 'RESUME'
command.

      This enhancem...