Browse Prior Art Database

Enhanced Directory Entries

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120347D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Griffin, DL: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Today's office systems and applications support, if not force, a style of work that requires users to choose a messaging medium, e.g., e-mail, phone, fax, etc., before specifying how to access the receiver. For example, Joe needs to remind Jane about an afternoon meeting. Although he knew what he needed to do, he still had to choose a communication medium before specifying how to access Jane. And Joe probably had to look up Jane's electronic address, her area code, her phone number, or her fax number. Now, if the chosen medium is not available, he has to go through the cycle again, including a potential look-up of access information.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Enhanced Directory Entries

      Today's office systems and applications support, if not
force, a style of work that requires users to choose a messaging
medium, e.g., e-mail, phone, fax, etc., before specifying how to
access the receiver.  For example, Joe needs to remind Jane about an
afternoon meeting.  Although he knew what he needed to do, he still
had to choose a communication medium before specifying how to access
Jane. And Joe probably had to look up Jane's electronic address, her
area code, her phone number, or her fax number. Now, if the chosen
medium is not available, he has to go through the cycle again,
including a potential look-up of access information.

      Address books, or directories, in today's office systems
typically provide information like electronic address and phone
number.  Some of the address books, like that of OfficeVision*, are
even configurable to allow additional entries.  So, address book
administrators could define fields for fax numbers, departmental
printers, etc.

      Even so, this information is static, i.e., it is only used for
reference. Some office systems, like OfficeVision, may allow easy
transfer of the information -- copy and paste, drag, etc. -- to
complete a field in an action dialog -- send, print, fax, etc.
However, this is not an order of magnitude improvement.  Using the
above example, Joe would still have to choose the phone and copy or
drag the phone number from the entry to a field in the phone's dial
dialog.

      Thus, assume...