Browse Prior Art Database

Integrated Audio-Graphics User Interface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120380D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 4 page(s) / 152K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bakoglu, HB: AUTHOR

Abstract

An integrated audio and graphics user interface (AGUI) is described which is significantly easier to use and faster than the current graphics user interfaces. The described scheme and apparatus is flexible, does not require too much CPU processing power, and provides interchangeable audio and graphics interfaces.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Integrated Audio-Graphics User Interface

      An integrated audio and graphics user interface (AGUI) is
described which is significantly easier to use and faster than the
current graphics user interfaces.  The described scheme and apparatus
is flexible, does not require too much CPU processing power, and
provides interchangeable audio and graphics interfaces.

      This article describes an AGUI.  The hardware that can support
such an interface in a workstation is shown in Fig. 1.  This user
interface can be employed not only in computers but also consumer
products such as television (TV) sets, video cassette players (VCRs)
and high-definition television (HDTV) sets.  The novel features of
this interface are listed below.
1.   The audio input is menu-driven.  The user follows a menu from
the screen and, because the options are limited, the complexity of
the speech recognition that the CPU has to perform is significantly
reduced.
2.   The items in the menu are chosen such that similar sounding key-
words are avoided in the same menu.  This again simplifies the speech
recognition task and, as a result, minimizes the processing power
demand from the CPU, speeds up the speech recognition process and
minimizes the chance for an error.
3.   The audio, keyboard and mouse inputs are fully integrated and
interchangeable.  At any time, the user can switch from the audio
input to mouse (point and click), or keyboard for any input.  Any
function can be done by any one of the three input devices.

      Using this scheme the mouse of the computer can be replaced by
the audio input and, in consumer products, the remote control of the
TV set or the VCR can be replaced by the voice input.

      As an example, let us look at a possible AGUI for a schedule
management and mail program similar to IBM's PROFS* system.  The menu
shown in Fig. 2 can be graphically displayed at the monitor and,
simultaneously, can be sent to the built-in loudspeaker prompting the
user verbally.  The speech synthesis technology for achieving this is
already available.  The speech recognition task is simplified by
limiting the inputs of the user to the menu items.  A voice-mail
system can be easily integrated with this scheme by digitizing the
sound and compressing it at input, and synthesizing it during
retrieval.

      Note how the keywords in the menus are selected such that
similar sounding entries are avoided in a menu, simplifying the
speech recognition process.  Fig. 3 shows an example of a bad choice
of menu entries (today, old, all) where "old" and "all" can be easily
confused, and the improved version where "old" is replaced by "back."

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