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Frequency Extender for Synchroscan Streak Camera

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120499D
Original Publication Date: 1991-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 101K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cina, M: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method to extend the operating range of a synchroscan streak camera which operates at a fixed signal frequency. A synchroscan streak camera provides a two-dimensional display of intensity of light pulses along the camera input slit as a function of time, with a temporal resolution of better than 10 ps. The synchroscan streak camera requires an external electrical trigger signal to accumulate the repetitively generated streak images at a fixed position on the phosphor screen over a time period. The frequency of this trigger signal, which is usually of sinusoidal form, is fixed because of the tuned streak sweep circuit design. In addition, it must have a low time jitter relative to the light signal. Any timing jitter between them results in a display of a pulse having an apparently longer duration.

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Frequency Extender for Synchroscan Streak Camera

      Disclosed is a method to extend the operating range of a
synchroscan streak camera which operates at a fixed signal frequency.
A synchroscan streak camera provides a two-dimensional display of
intensity of light pulses along the camera input slit as a function
of time, with a temporal resolution of better than 10 ps.  The
synchroscan streak camera requires an external electrical trigger
signal to accumulate the repetitively generated streak images at a
fixed position on the phosphor screen over a time period. The
frequency of this trigger signal, which is usually of sinusoidal
form, is fixed because of the tuned streak sweep circuit design.  In
addition, it must have a low time jitter relative to the light
signal.  Any timing jitter between them results in a display of a
pulse having an apparently longer duration.

      In a typical experiment, a stable electrical signal source,
usually a frequency synthesizer, controls the light pulse generation
and the same source provides the trigger signal for the streak
camera.  However, such arrangement using a single master signal
restricts the operating frequency of the light pulse generation to
the fixed trigger signal frequency of the streak camera.  The tuning
range for the trigger signal frequency is limited, typically of the
order of 1 MHz.  It is sometimes desirable to generate the light
pulses at repetition rates which are harmonic or sub-harmonic
frequencies of the trigger signal of the camera.

      One approach is to use another frequency synthesizer
phase-locked to the master signal generator which controls the light
pulse generation.  The slave frequency synthesizer provides the
trigger signal for the streak camera.  Although this approach
provides experimental flexibility, it requires comparable phase
stability of both synthesizers.

      The present approach uses a high-speed, low-phase-noise
frequency divider to divide the master frequency appropriately into a
frequency that can be used to trigger the camera or control the ligh...