Browse Prior Art Database

Technique for Replicating Distributed Directory Information

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120536D
Original Publication Date: 1991-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 8 page(s) / 325K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Austin, JH: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

A technique is disclosed which facilitates the subsetting and replication of directory information in a distributed environment. The technique, which is not dependent on the network topology or data content, provides subsetting of the directory information. Through replication, it facilitates the management and control of the data while providing flexibility for satisfying differing requirements and balancing the trade-off between the amount of data storage and performance required.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 22% of the total text.

Technique for Replicating Distributed Directory Information

      A technique is disclosed which facilitates the subsetting
and replication of directory information in a distributed
environment.  The technique, which is not dependent on the network
topology or data content, provides subsetting of the directory
information.  Through replication, it facilitates the management and
control of the data while providing flexibility for satisfying
differing requirements and balancing the trade-off between the amount
of data storage and performance required.

      Also disclosed is the application of the technique by the
directory service to allow it to recursively manage its own
information in the same manner that it manages other directory
information.

      The objects contained within a computer based directory are
frequently objects known or managed by the computers in the network,
or by the users of those computers.  Examples of the former might
include objects such as the computers themselves (sometimes called
"nodes"), the users themselves (sometimes denoted by "user
identification"), groups of data or information, such as computer
files or data bases, or the information in the directory itself.
Examples of the latter also include objects known to the user of the
computer system, but not necessarily known or managed by the
computer, such as the postal or residence address of individuals.

      With the diversity of objects to be included within a
computerized directory, it is apparent that the characteristics of
the objects may differ greatly and that the requirements for each
object may even conflict.  For example, the residence location of an
individual is normally stable and changes infrequently, while the
existence and location of a computer data file may be extremely
volatile and transitory.  The requirements for dissemination of
updated information and the ability to be tolerant of temporary
inaccuracies of the data differ for users of the two different types
of directory data.

      A computer-based directory in a distributed environment must be
able to accommodate a broad diversity of objects about which it
contains information, and to facilitate the directory's ability to
satisfy greatly differing or conflicting requirements pertaining to
the objects.

      In order to describe the disclosed technique for subsetting and
replication of directory information, it is convenient to first
define several terms.

      The collection of all information contained in the directory
can be organized as disjoint named subsets, called Partitions.  A
Partition Name, which identifies a collection of directory entries
that can be independently accessed, distributed or administered, is
structured such that
   Partition Name = Class. Level.
   Partition_Name_Qualifier(s)
where:
 Class distinguishes between the defined types of
 directory service classes, e.g., electronic mail, telephone,
 data file, data ba...