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Browse Prior Art Database

Automated Library Clean-Up Triggered by Thermal Or Power Concerns

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120537D
Original Publication Date: 1991-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 90K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Patton, DL: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Automated library boxes may hold optical, magnetic, or other storage medium suitable for mount and dismount in robotically serviced drives. Should there be an over-temperature or "brown-out" power loss in such a library box, the function of that library box might be impaired by continued operation under such conditions. In this article, we propose the following five clean-up activities which would be triggered by an over-temperature or "brown-out" power loss condition. 1. No new volume mounts by the robotic picker would be allowed. 2. All drives currently empty would be powered down. 3. All inactive drives still holding a cartridge would be spun-down if they held an optical or magnetic disk. If these drives held tape, the tape cartridges would be rewound to their load point.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Automated Library Clean-Up Triggered by Thermal Or Power Concerns

      Automated library boxes may hold optical, magnetic, or
other storage medium suitable for mount and dismount in robotically
serviced drives.  Should there be an over-temperature or "brown-out"
power loss in such a library box, the function of that library box
might be impaired by continued operation under such conditions.  In
this article, we propose the following five clean-up activities which
would be triggered by an over-temperature or "brown-out" power loss
condition.
      1.  No new volume mounts by the robotic picker would be
allowed.
      2.  All drives currently empty would be powered down.
      3.  All inactive drives still holding a cartridge would be
spun-down if they held an optical or magnetic disk. If these drives
held tape, the tape cartridges would be rewound to their load point.
If possible, these cartridges would then be unloaded from their
respective drives and put in their cartridge storage slots.
      4.   If current read/write operations are possible, they may be
continued.  However, no new operations would be allowed to any
remaining active volumes.  Once these active drives became inactive,
step 3 would apply to them as well.
      5.   Once all drives were empty, all cartridges put away, and
an error code sent to host, the whole library box would be powered
down.

      It is preferred that implementation of all five of the above
activities be a standard part of the library clean-up. As an
alternative embodiment, the clean-up activities could be selectable
via a menu.  If a menu choice is offered, the user could be able to
select which of the above five activities to take in case either
there was an over-temperature or "brown-out" power-loss condition
inside of the library box.

      The library box could encounter a thermal problem due to any
number of scenarios.  These scenarios may be external to the library,
such as failed air conditioning in the building housing the library,
or internal to the library, such as a clogged air filter, an
inoperable fan, or an overheating power supply.  The electrical
output of commercially available thermal sensors m...