Browse Prior Art Database

Subsetting of Directory Partitions And Conditional Use for Query

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120538D
Original Publication Date: 1991-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 125K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Austin, JH: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is an algorithm for providing the capability for the subsetting of directory partitions which are to be conditionally searched when performing a distributed directory query.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Subsetting of Directory Partitions And Conditional Use for Query

      Disclosed is an algorithm for providing the capability
for the subsetting of directory partitions which are to be
conditionally searched when performing a distributed directory query.

      Subsetting and conditionally searching allow a query to be
terminated (satisfied) at logical (requestor supplied) places without
searching through the entire list of directory partitions.  With
subsetting and conditional searching, queries can complete in less
time (reduced response time to user) and can also reduce the CPU
processing time.

      This algorithm is applicable to a general distributed query
environment when there is more than one location to be queried.

      An electronic directory may be segmented into information
partitions in a fashion which is similar to the way a telephone
directory is segmented into telephone books (see the figure).  These
directory partitions can be located anywhere in the directory
network.  A list of directory partitions may be specified to be
searched on a distributed directory query.  All partitions in the
list will be searched without regard to order (i.e., the "Raleigh"
phone book will not necessarily be searched before the "Tampa" phone
book).  The query will not complete until each directory partition in
the list has been searched.  This can be time consuming and result in
many matches (based on the search criteria of the query).

      For example, if the list of directory partitions = ("Raleigh,"
"Cary," "RTP," "Chapel Hill," "Dallas," "Tampa") and the search
criteria is name=Smith, all directory entries with the name=Smith
from each phone book in the list will be returned.  Since the
partitions (phone books) in the list will be searched without any
particular order, the directory entries (matches) in the "Tampa"
phone book could be returned first.

      The net is that a list of directory partitions will be searched
in a random order and the query will not complete until each
partition in the list has been searched.

      With this disclosed algorithm, a list of directory partitions
can be subset into user-supplied groupings which allow the
specification of an organized rather than a random search of
directory partitions.  A list of directory partitions can be subset
into two or more groups.  All directory partitions within a group
will be searched in any order (i.e., the group is unordered).
However, groups will be searched in the order they are listed.
User-supplied groupings permit a user to define a sphere of interest.
If directory partitions are thought of as phone books, grouping
allows the user to indicate which phone books are to be searched
first.  Included in this disclosure is the capabi...