Browse Prior Art Database

Precision Stack-Up Station

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120563D
Original Publication Date: 1991-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 8 page(s) / 347K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Barenboim, M: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The precision stack-up station is a production tool used to assemble a number of laminates and composite sheets of various thicknesses in a precise stack, as used in the production of printed circuit boards. The concept described herein allows laminates (layers) or composite sheets to be positioned, aligned and assembled to close tolerances.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 26% of the total text.

Precision Stack-Up Station

      The precision stack-up station is a production tool used
to assemble a number of laminates and composite sheets of various
thicknesses in a precise stack, as used in the production of printed
circuit boards.  The concept described herein allows laminates
(layers) or composite sheets to be positioned, aligned and assembled
to close tolerances.

      Fig. 1a is a perspective view which shows the end product where
a number of composite sheets 1 of various thicknesses (.004" to
.050"), are positioned in a precise stack 2.  Fig. 1b is a top view
showing that each sheet has its own pattern 3 and a set of common
pre-locating holes 4 and locating holes 5.  The required accuracy of
placement of top and bottom is approximately + 7 microns.  A fast
cure adhesive is used to hold the product together as it goes through
a post-stacking process.

      Composite sheets 1 are presented for alignment and stacking by
various handling methods, such as by a robot, carousel, or in-line
type of mechanism.  Figs. 2 through 5 depict two types of production
stacking tools and are shown to illustrate how the precision stack-up
station is used. Figs. 2, 3a and 3b utilize robot 6 while Fig. 4
(perspective view) utilizes XZ-slide 7 as the material handling
means.

      Fig. 3a is a top view of the robot handling device. Fig. 3b
shows the details of section Z-Z (Fig. 3a); Fig. 3c shows the details
of section A-A (Fig. 3b); Fig. 3d shows the details of section B-B
(Fig. 3c); and Fig. 3e shows the details of section X-X (Fig. 3a).

      For the XZ-slide device, Fig. 5a shows a top view of Fig. 4;
Fig.  5b shows the front view of Fig. 4; Fig. 5c shows section A-A
(Fig.  5b); and Fig. 5d shows section B-B (Fig. 5c).  Although each
handling method has its own configuration, some of the sub-assemblies
are common for both.  The common aspects are as follows:
   - Load station 8, as shown in Figs. 2, 4, and 5a, are spaced
within robot work envelope 9 (Fig. 3a), or on a common center line 10
(Fig. 5a), where carriers (not shown) containing the product are
manually loaded and unloaded by the operator.
     - Pre-alignment station 11, shown in Figs. 2, 3a, 4 and 5a, is
where the product is placed by either robot 6, or by an  XZ-Slide 7.
     - Precision stack-up station 12, shown in Figs. 3a, 4, and 5a,
is used for positioning, aligning and stacking operations.
   - Exit station 13, shown in Figs. 3a, 3e, 4, 5b and 5d, equipped
with elevator 14, receives the finished product.
     - A tool control unit (not shown) is included and consists of a
controller, front end electronics, power distribution, and the
required software.

      Operations performed by the two types of production stacking
tools are almost identical.  Both tools present composite sheets 1
(Figs. 1a and 1b), to precision stack-up station 12 (Figs. 3a, 4 and
5a) for positioning, alignment and stacking processes.  The finished
pro...