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Browse Prior Art Database

Fusing System for a Color Printer Or Copier

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120576D
Original Publication Date: 1991-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 91K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Britto, LI: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Fig. 1 shows the time-temperature requirements for fusing color transparencies and also black toner on paper. The toned transparency must be heated for 200 - 300 msec in the nip of the fuser to ensure that the toner has completely melted and coalesced to form a body substantially free of voids and grain boundaries. For a typical EP machine with a process speed of 4 ips, the residence time required indicates a nip width of 0.8 to 1.2 inches. Typically, dual roll fuser nip widths are 0.5 inch or less, with low-cost machines having nip widths generally than 0.2 inch.

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Fusing System for a Color Printer Or Copier

      Fig. 1 shows the time-temperature requirements for fusing
color transparencies and also black toner on paper.  The toned
transparency must be heated for 200 - 300 msec in the nip of the
fuser to ensure that the toner has completely melted and coalesced to
form a body substantially free of voids and grain boundaries.  For a
typical EP machine with a process speed of 4 ips, the residence time
required indicates a nip width of 0.8 to 1.2 inches.  Typically, dual
roll fuser nip widths are 0.5 inch or less, with low-cost machines
having nip widths generally than 0.2 inch.

      As an alternative to decreasing the speed of the fuser or
providing large, expensive fuser rolls, the necessary residence time
may be achieved for color transparencies by the system shown in Fig.
2.  A hollow fusing roller 1 heated internally by a lamp 2 is
provided with a low surface energy surface such as TEFLON* and
possibly treated with a release agent such as silicone oil.
Compliant roller 3 is pressed against roller 1 by springs (not
shown).  An endless belt 7 made of compliant material, such as
silicone rubber, or made of a compliant material on a non-compliant
substrate, such as steel, passes around compliant rollers 3, 4 and 5.
The length of the belt and the arrangement of the rollers is such
that the belt is in tension in Fig. 1.  Frame 6 and actuator 8 hold
the configuration as shown, and a toned transparency 9 enters the
fusing regio...