Browse Prior Art Database

PC 3270 Coax Trace Tool

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120634D
Original Publication Date: 1991-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Carissimo, DJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The 3270 emulator card can be used as a Coax Trace Tool simply by changing the firmware used to run the microcontroller on the card. The card consists of a high-speed microcontroller, a data buffer memory, an instruction memory, a Personal Computer bus interface, and a 3270 coax cable interface.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 66% of the total text.

PC 3270 Coax Trace Tool

      The 3270 emulator card can be used as a Coax Trace Tool
simply by changing the firmware used to run the microcontroller on
the card.  The card consists of a high-speed microcontroller, a data
buffer memory, an instruction memory, a Personal Computer bus
interface, and a 3270 coax cable interface.

      When the Personal Computer with the 3270 card is first powered
up, the firmware executed by the 8X305 microcontroller initializes
the card.  The initialization clears the buffer memory and the
dual-port register array which is used to pass parameters between the
PC and the microcontroller on the card.  The microcontroller then
waits until the PC is ready to start tracing coax cable activity by
enabling the card.  This is done by setting a flag bit in the
dual-port register array.

      When the firmware detects that the enable bit is set in the
dual-port register array, it enters the Trace Loop.  In the Trace
Loop the firmware waits for serial data to come in from either the
device or the controller.  The receiver will convert the serial data
into parallel and check it for proper protocol.  If it was received
correctly, it will load it into the Receive Data latch and set the
Data Available flag.  When the microcontroller detects the Data
Available flag, it reads in the data.  The data is then stored
sequentially in the Data Buffer Memory.  The microcontroller then
increments the Buffer Memory address counter and checks for...