Browse Prior Art Database

Tape Head Alignment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120711D
Original Publication Date: 1991-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Anand, A: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The heads are aligned by determining the average azimuth of the read and write gaps and aligning that average azimuth to be perpendicular to a bottom flange alignment mark.

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Tape Head Alignment

      The heads are aligned by determining the average azimuth of the
read and write gaps and aligning that average azimuth to be
perpendicular to a bottom flange alignment mark.

      As shown in Figure 1, the average azimuth 10 of the write 11
and read 12 gaps is employed for alignment of the head.

      This method of alignment has proven more effective than
alignment of either the read or the write gaps.  For example, Figure
2 shows in superposition the gaps of heads A and B which are of equal
but opposite skew.  It is evident that tapes written on head A (WA)
and read on head B (RB) have no relative skew and vice versa.  Hence,
when aligned to the average, machines A and B compensate for each
other.

      The technique for alignment is shown in Figure 3.  The head FRU
assembly is mounted on an optical skew fixture. After aligning one
axis of the stage travel parallel to the bottom flanges, the
microscope is focused on the read gap 12 and the stage is traversed
in a perpendicular direction. While track 1 of the read gap is
aligned to the center, the transverse micrometer is displaced by a
dimension C to align the track 18 of the read gap.

      From the manufacturing standpoint, it is more convenient if the
displayed reticle on the TV monitor is programmed to displace by the
required amount C for each alignment as shown in Figure 4.

      Disclosed anonymously