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Enhanced Adhesion to Glass Substrates using Tantalum Oxide Adhesion Layer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120718D
Original Publication Date: 1991-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Batey, J: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a process which improves copper film adhesion to glass substrates by using a tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) insulating adhesion layer. Ta2O5 is a transparent insulator that can be easily deposited by conventional sputtering from a composite target, or by reactive sputtering from a tantalum target. This insulating layer is deposited directly onto a cleaned glass substrate, and a copper film is deposited directly onto the layer.

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Enhanced Adhesion to Glass Substrates using Tantalum Oxide Adhesion
Layer

      Disclosed is a process which improves copper film adhesion to
glass substrates by using a tantalum oxide (Ta2O5) insulating
adhesion layer.  Ta2O5 is a transparent insulator that can be easily
deposited by conventional sputtering from a composite target, or by
reactive sputtering from a tantalum target.  This insulating layer is
deposited directly onto a cleaned glass substrate, and a copper film
is deposited directly onto the layer.

      A typical application would be in Thin Film Transistor/ Liquid
Crystal Display (TFT/LCD) fabrication.  The need for a high
conductivity gate line in TFT/LCD's to reduce gate line signal delay
is well known.  Copper (resistivity 2.0mLcm) and aluminum (typical
resistivity 3.0mLcm) are two of the most desirable candidates, but
they have typically not been used for this application, principally
because of poor adhesion to glass.  For example, blanket copper films
deposited by electron beam evaporation onto glass substrates are
known to delaminate; blanket films deposited by in-line sputtering
adhere as deposited, but can be peeled off by using scotch tape.  The
usual alternative process that allows the use of copper gate metal
requires the use of a metal adhesion layer (typically chromium or
molybdenum) between the copper and the glass substrate.  However,
this requires an extra etching step to pattern the adhesion layer
after patterning the copper...