Browse Prior Art Database

Language And Grade Level Codes for Audio Object Architecture

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120763D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 84K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bonsall, GW: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The present invention relates to improved data processing systems and in particular to improved methods for storing and interchanging data within a data processing system. Still more particularly, the present invention relates to a method and apparatus for the efficient interchange of audio data within a data processing system.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Language And Grade Level Codes for Audio Object Architecture

      The present invention relates to improved data processing
systems and in particular to improved methods for storing and
interchanging data within a data processing system. Still more
particularly, the present invention relates to a method and apparatus
for the efficient interchange of audio data within a data processing
system.

      The interchange of data within a data processing system is a
well known feature of modern state-of-the-art computer systems. Text
and graphics may be efficiently interchanged between data processing
facilities utilizing well known modem devices or facsimile
devices/cards.  Recently, modern computer systems have begun to
experiment in so-called "multimedia" data. That is, presentations
containing audio, video, text, graphics and image combined into a
common presentation. Many advances have been demonstrated in defining
these data storage and interchange representations, both as
individual data types or as a single, integrated representation. The
present invention describes an enhancement to the audio data
interchange representation.

      Audio data may be stored and interchanged as analog data, such
as audio tape and AM or FM radio signals. Additionally, audio data
may be stored and interchanged as coded data, which includes coded
values for 'physical' factors, such as tone, duration, loudness, etc.
One example of coded audio data is the so-called Musical Instrument
Digital Interface (MIDI), in which keystrokes are encoded and
exchanged utilizing a common interface. Finally, audio data may be
stored and interchanged as uncoded data, or data which simply
represents a digital representation of an audio signal, such as the
signal encoded on a compact audio disk.

      To date, the storage and interchange forms have fo...