Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Method of Automating the Dictation And Transcription Functions of a Radiology Department

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120815D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 66K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Colburn, DF: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

In a hospital radiology department or any other area which requires dictation/transcription services (medical records, pathology, etc.), it is common for a radiologist to dictate his report of an X-ray, CT scan, ultrasound scan, etc., and pass that dictation along to a medical transcriptionist for transcription and entry into the hospital's information system. Additionally, interested parties, such as the ordering physician, must be notified that the diagnosis results are available for review. Conventionally, this is a manual, slow, labor- intensive operation. This invention automates the dictation, transcription and result notifications of a radiology department.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 60% of the total text.

Method of Automating the Dictation And Transcription Functions of
a Radiology Department

      In a hospital radiology department or any other area
which requires dictation/transcription services (medical records,
pathology, etc.), it is common for a radiologist to dictate his
report of an X-ray, CT scan, ultrasound scan, etc., and pass that
dictation along to a medical transcriptionist for transcription and
entry into the hospital's information system.  Additionally,
interested parties, such as the ordering physician, must be notified
that the diagnosis results are available for review.  Conventionally,
this is a manual, slow, labor- intensive operation.  This invention
automates the dictation, transcription and result notifications of a
radiology department.

      Referring to the figure, the solution entails the use of a
Local Area Network (LAN) 10, to connect the various workstations
which make up the system.  Radiologists phone their results into a
Telephone Interface Facility (TIF) 12 (which can handle up to 10
simultaneous users), which answers the phone, handles the user
identification and verification, and collects the radiologists'
findings in a digitized voice file.  This voice file is transferred
over the LAN 10 to a Voice File Server (VFS) 14.   The VFS 14 makes
the voice file immediately available for retrieval by a
transcriptionist working at a Transcription Work Station (TWS) 16.

      The medical transcriptionist, sitting at a TWS 16, i...