Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Graphic Office Interface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120835D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 4 page(s) / 142K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Heggestad, SP: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This workstation interface uses animation, graphics, and sound to represent the user's office environment. Object representation is as close to reality as the technology can support. For example, a desk is not a flat surface, but a three-dimensional view showing drawers and conventional desk-top objects such as a telephone, calendar, and stapler (see Fig. 1). Actions that in a real office are performed by people are performed by animated figures instead of commands or icons. For example, an appointment reminder is spoken by a "secretary" who appears when the reminder is due.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Graphic Office Interface

      This workstation interface uses animation, graphics, and
sound to represent the user's office environment.  Object
representation is as close to reality as the technology can support.
For example, a desk is not a flat surface, but a three-dimensional
view showing drawers and conventional desk-top objects such as a
telephone, calendar, and stapler (see Fig. 1).  Actions that in a
real office are performed by people are performed by animated figures
instead of commands or icons.  For example, an appointment reminder
is spoken by a "secretary" who appears when the reminder is due.

      This interface provides a representation that appears and
behaves like something with which the user is familiar. The
application will:  generate less anxiety in the user, encourage the
user to explore the interface (and, hence, the functions of the
application), require little in the way of translation for National
Language Support, and require less training for a user to accomplish
"real work" using the application.

      The following table lists some differences between the existing
iconic interface and the proposed interface:

      Iconic interface                  Proposed interface
 Icons are small, square, and all    Objects are proportionally
 the same size (see Fig. 2).         sized.
 Icons are two-dimensional, flat     Objects are three-dimensional,
 views of a three-dimensional world. perspective views.
 Icons require descriptive text      Objects closely resemble their
 to identify and differentiate       real-world counterparts.
 them from icons of similar or       Discarding objects is done by
 identical appearance.  The text     moving the object to the
 must be translated into different   wastebasket and seeing it
 languages and may not fit within    become shredded or crumbled.
 the confines of the icon size.      Text, and so translation, is
 See Fig. 3; notice that the         not necessary.
 text under the icon for the file
 cabinet was abbreviated to
 "File Cab".

      Continued:
 Icons are identical in all        Different appearances of the
 countries.  Although calendars    same object should be created
 in other countries may be very    to support different cultures,
 different in appearance, the      countries, and manufacturers.
 calendar icon is always the same  For example, different calen-
 and lessens the user's awareness  dars, different printers, dif-
 of its meaning by trying to be    ferent telephones and mailboxes
 so generic.                       should be available.
 Some icon representations are not Graphic representations of
 consistent with the real work.    furniture and equipment appear
 For example, people do not store  in logical places within an...