Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

KILLDBM - A Program to Perform a Forced STOPDBM On a Database Server Even If Users Are Still Connected

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120838D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jordan, LE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

KILLDBM allows a system administrator to perform a STOPDBM (Stop Database Manager) on an OS/2* EE database server, even if users are still connected to a database. The system administrator can then perform routine operations (such as backup), which is not currently possible.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 63% of the total text.

KILLDBM - A Program to Perform a Forced STOPDBM On a Database Server
Even If Users Are Still Connected

      KILLDBM allows a system administrator to perform a
STOPDBM (Stop Database Manager) on an OS/2* EE database server, even
if users are still connected to a database.  The system administrator
can then perform routine operations (such as backup), which is not
currently possible.

      KILLDBM is a simple program which solves the following problem:
Many users have LAN (Local Area Networks) on which they do remote
database access using the Remote Data Services of the OS/2 EE
Database Manager.  At the end of each day or week it is common to
want to perform a backup of the critical database files.  Backup will
only work on files which are not currently being accessed.  To insure
this (for the database files), the system administrator usually does
a STOPDBM (Stop Database Manager).

      The problem is that STOPDBM only works if there are no users
connected to any databases on the server.  If one (or more) users are
still connected to a database, STOPDBM will not work.  The only way
around this previously was to call the person, or to go to their
office and end the program. Since many networks have users off-site,
this was not practical.  In fact, the most common scenario was to
have a user connect to a database via Query Manager, and then forget
to turn it off before they went home.  Their office is locked, and
they are not reachable. Hence, the databa...