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Browse Prior Art Database

Spherical Cooling Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120968D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 81K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kando, L: AUTHOR

Abstract

The success of any computer chip cooling device depends on maximum surface contacts. Manufacturing tolerances of the hardware plus the imperfect mounting of the chip on the substrate add up to the commonly called "chip tilt." The ideal cooling device should be able to compensate for chip tilt from any direction, it should maintain maximum surface contact, and it should adjust for height variations. The Spherical Cooling Device will deliver all these requirements.

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Spherical Cooling Device

      The success of any computer chip cooling device depends
on maximum surface contacts.  Manufacturing tolerances of the
hardware plus the imperfect mounting of the chip on the substrate add
up to the commonly called "chip tilt."  The ideal cooling device
should be able to compensate for chip tilt from any direction, it
should maintain maximum surface contact, and it should adjust for
height variations.  The Spherical Cooling Device will deliver all
these requirements.

      The Spherical Cooling Device is composed from three simple
parts (see Fig. 4), which are:
      1.  Wedge
      2.  Compression spring
      3.  Ball (or pin) section

      The wedge contacts the chip surface on the top side and the
half ball (Fig. 1) or pin (Fig. 2) on the other side. The compression
spring is fastened into the wedge's back. The spring pushes the wedge
forward to the correct height. Due to the one-point suspension, the
spring will allow the wedge to tilt and rotate to compensate for most
chip tilt.

      The lower side of the wedge is sliding on a half ball (or pin).
This ball (or pin) "hinges" in the hat.  This hinging motion will
allow the wedge's top surface to settle on the chip's contact surface
without any gap, regardless of which way the chip is tilting.

      There is a choice of using half-ball, or half-pin.  The
Spherical Cooling Device will work well with both.  This gives the
designer an extra advan...