Browse Prior Art Database

Throughput Enhancement Scheme for Multi-Strike Printing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000120991D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 102K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lee, HC: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Overstrikes are often necessary for engraved line printers to print non-alphanumeric characters, such as bar codes, dot-matrices and foreign characters. Typically, these multi-strike elements are added to a regular alphanumeric type set. The enlargement of the set and overstrikes reduces the printing throughput.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Throughput Enhancement Scheme for Multi-Strike Printing

      Overstrikes are often necessary for engraved line
printers to print non-alphanumeric characters, such as bar codes,
dot-matrices and foreign characters.  Typically, these multi-strike
elements are added to a regular alphanumeric type set.  The
enlargement of the set and overstrikes reduces the printing
throughput.

      For example, a print band may have 21 dot and 18 bar elements
in addition to 57 alphanumerical type elements totalling 96 for the
set, as shown in Fig. 1.  Dots are used to construct large characters
and logos, and bars are used to form bar codes.  These elements may
require as many as 3 strikes to complete a printed line while
alphanumerics are printed with single strikes.

      In a band printer, the hammer at each print position selects
and prints the desired element during passing of a set on the print
band, which is called a print cycle.  If the hammer requires
overstrikes, the paper increment is suppressed and the next element
is printed during the next print cycle.  Fig. 2 shows an example of
text to print a line consisting of alphanumerics, ABQ%, dot elements
represented by abcdefghi, and bar elements designated by  b .  The
plus (+) sign in the carriage control (CC) column commands the
printer to suppress the paper increment as required for overstrikes.

      It is seen that the doubled set size and triple-strikes to
complete a printed line result in a slower rate of printing than the
normal single-strike printing with 48 character set by a factor of
about 6.  However, the fact that the alphanumerics do not require
overstrikes can be used to reduce the set on the multi-set band.  The
57 alphanumerics are subdiv...