Browse Prior Art Database

Icon Pane Class

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121013D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 81K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cavendish, C: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The introduction of object-oriented technology into the software development arena requires that standard sets of reusable classes be developed as part of an object-oriented framework. This article describes the design of a class which is used for an object-oriented user interface and allows direct manipulation of icons and their associated interactions.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Icon Pane Class

      The introduction of object-oriented technology into the
software development arena requires that standard sets of reusable
classes be developed as part of an object-oriented framework. This
article describes the design of a class which is used for an
object-oriented user interface and allows direct manipulation of
icons and their associated interactions.

      The design of a generic icon pane class is provided here for
use in any object-oriented system. An object-oriented system allows
the class code to be reused by programmers through inheritance via
subclassing or by inclusion (i.e., as parts of a new class). The icon
pane class provides the ability to directly manipulate icons and
their associated underlying application or data objects.

      The icon pane class is part of an object-oriented class
hierarchy developed for a future release of OfficeVision* which
provides the end user with direct manipulation capability. For
example, an icon representing a note object can be deleted by the
user with the aid of a pointing device, such as a mouse, by dragging
the note's icon over the shredder's icon in the desktop window.

      The icon pane class encapsulates the behavior of the direct
manipulation facility and its associated interpretations. It is
designed to be a part of the 'view' classes of an object in a
model-view system.  In this system, the 'viewable' objects, such as
windows, buttons, list boxes, etc., are considered to be 'views' of
an object, and the underlying application code is considered to be
the 'model'. This scheme allows for platform-independent code to be
developed for the application layer.

      The model objects consist of the data portion of an application
...