Browse Prior Art Database

Background Scribble Pad for Os/2 Desktop

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121031D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 3 page(s) / 131K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Seaburg, GP: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a program called "Scribble Pad" which imitates the background desktop on an IBM Operating System/2* (OS/2*) Version 1.2. Scribble Pad provides a computerized version of the traditional desktop blotter, providing a place to write notes on the system "background" area by using the system mouse or other pointing device.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Background Scribble Pad for Os/2 Desktop

      Disclosed is a program called "Scribble Pad" which
imitates the background desktop on an IBM Operating System/2* (OS/2*)
Version 1.2.  Scribble Pad provides a computerized version of the
traditional desktop blotter, providing a place to write notes on the
system "background" area by using the system mouse or other pointing
device.

      Scribble Pad uses the graphics capabilities of OS/2
Presentation Manager* (PM) to hold user drawings.  The program
creates a large PM bitmap image area the same size as the physical
display area on the system.  It intercepts and bypasses the standard
PM message handling features so that the Scribble Pad window always
remains in the background, underneath any other windows on the
system.  It uses the mouse handling features to provide an on-screen
drawing capability.

      Scribble Pad handles the Presentation Manager WM_MOUSEMOVE and
WM_BUTTONx messages to let the user draw images on its window with
the mouse.  In the idle mode, the program ignores mouse movements and
users see no indication that Scribble Pad is present.  However, when
the user presses mouse button number 1 while directly over the
Scribble Pad window, the program switches itself into drawing mode.

      While in drawing mode, the mouse pointer shown on the screen
changes to a pencil shape.  If the mouse is moved while button 1 is
still held down, Scribble Pad processes each individual PM mouse
movement message and draws thin lines on its window between
subsequent pointer locations. The program reverts back to idle mode
when button 1 is released.  The series of lines drawn by Scribble Pad
are usually short enough that the overall mouse strokes appear as
smooth lines.

      With a little practice, users can become quite proficient at
using the mouse for drawing, sketching pictures and writing notes to
themselves. (Substituting a pencil-shaped stylus for the mouse might
make drawing even easier than using a mouse.)  The figure shows how a
typical Scribble Pad user's screen might appear.

      The upper right corn...