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Independent Code Page Definition With Scalable Fonts

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121036D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 75K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brown, JK: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a process whereby code pages, such as National Language codepages, are defined independently from the font character data.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Independent Code Page Definition With Scalable Fonts

      Disclosed is a process whereby code pages, such as
National Language codepages, are defined independently from the font
character data.

      Most printers today have limited character sets defined for use
with font data.  Most applications have their own "different"
character sets for writing to the screen or devices.  Mismatches in
character sets are causing many users "printing" problems with
current printing solutions (e.g., characters missing, wrong
characters print).

      In current printing solutions, it is conventional that when a
font is defined, both the character design and the code page (i.e.,
symbol set) are specified.  In order to change either, both aspects
must be respecified.

      With outline font technology, it becomes possible to have many
outline characters for a given typeface, from which many possible
encodings or code pages can be supported.  It is easy to construct
internal architectures which allow for multiple default code pages;
however, regardless of how many default encodings a device supports,
there will always be an application that desires another encoding.

      Independent code page definition gives applications the freedom
to specify new code pages without having to respecify character
design data which is already defined.

      The idea behind independent code page definition is for an
application to tell the printer the mapping between codepoint and
desired character without having to define the character in terms of
a bitmap, as...