Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Adapting a Single-Task Distributed Application Design to a Non-Pre-Emptive Multi-Tasking Environment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121052D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 76K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Arnold, HH: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A method is presented which allows a distributed application, intended to run in a single-tasking environment, to execute multiple instances in a non-preemptive multi-tasking environment.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Method for Adapting a Single-Task Distributed Application Design
to a Non-Pre-Emptive Multi-Tasking Environment

      A method is presented which allows a distributed
application, intended to run in a single-tasking environment, to
execute multiple instances in a non-preemptive multi-tasking
environment.

      When a client-server software subsystem contains a client
program which is designed to operate in a single-tasking operating
environment, such as PCDOS, it can use NETBIOS in a synchronous
manner to communicate between the client and server programs and can
use a single NETBIOS name per client workstation to carry on the
client- server conversation.  When the client must execute in an
operating environment, such as that supplied by Microsoft WINDOWS,
which is characterized by non-preemptive multi-tasking operation,
resulting in the ability to execute multiple instances of the client
program in an apparently concurrent manner, the synchronous use of
NETBIOS with a single conversation and a single NETBIOS name for each
client workstation is insufficient, since, in this environment, there
may be concurrent outstanding requests from more than one application
program at a time.  In addition, the non-preemptive programming model
in effect causes all processes to be quiesced until the executing
process voluntarily gives up control to WINDOWS.  This could cause
the system to appear to stop for a long period of time if long client
requests were processed synchronously.

      This method adapts the single-task client design to a
non-pr...